04
Jun '15

Some of the best equipment to photograph food with

How far you want to push your photography is something you need to ask yourself, because there is so much choice out there when it comes to cameras that you could spend thousands on choosing the right camera and accessories.

Practice is a huge thing when it comes to any form of photography, so once you get a camera make you use it. Photograph everything you make because you’ll start to find out where the best lighting in your kitchen is, angles you might need to adopt and what particular types of food seem overly photogenic.

You don’t need a super duper fancy camera when taking photographs of food, but investing in a digital single-lens reflex camera (DSLR) camera is something you should really think about doing. With a camera like this you will have full control over your exposure and focal length and be able to create photos people will want to eat.

The age old battle of Nikon and Canon DSLR cameras is never ending but know that the differences between the two - especially in the lower end models - are pretty minimal. Comparable models in the two brands will produce photos of comparable quality so choose the best camera in your price range.

For a jack of all trades camera then get something like the Canon EOS 100D SLR camera which is quick and easy to use and boasts an impressive 18 megapixel photos and the ability to take HD videos if you choose to move into the vlogging area with your recipes.

The next thing you need to think about is the lens that you use for your photos as they will have as much (if not more) impact than the DSLR on your photos so you may want to buy the camera body and lens separately.

For food photography you’re probably best going for a fixed lens because they’re inexpensive, lightweight and easy to use. If you’re starting with a basic camera like the one above then grab a 35mm 1.8 lens, but if you’re using a more expensive full frame camera then you might want a 50mm. Why might you do this? Because a 35mm lens used on a cropped format camera effectively acts as a 50mm lens on a larger full format camera. Unless you’ve spent in excessive of a thousand pounds chances are your camera is cropped format.

Going back to the lens using a 35/50mm f1.8 lens will produce sharp photos and because it’s light weight if you want to do overhead photos or anything similar you’ll find it easy.

Other equipment you may need includes things to manipulate the light to ensure you have the best quality lighting possible.

You can get reflectors and diffusers which will allow light to bounce back from them and onto your food. This will enhance the colours and reduce shadows, two important factors when photographing food as you need the colours to be sharp.

If your kitchen is a little dark then don’t be afraid to photograph your food in another room, or even outside. But if this isn’t really an option then you might want to invest in a softbox which you can place near your workspace and will illuminate the area.

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